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3 Votes (1.3)
 
Virus (2013)
Virus (original title)
Fiction, 0 min
 
Production country   Greece
Language   Greek
Director   Angelos Frantzis
Scriptwriters   Angelos Frantzis, Spyros Kribalis
Producer   Maria Tsigka
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Plot
VIRUS is a psychological thriller set in Norilsk, Siberia. 

A Greek couple, Anna and Petros, living in Norilsk, is faced with the mysterious event of the woman getting pregnant with no intercourse. The questions raised relentless: was she cheating? Is she the victim of a conspiracy?  Or a Saint…? 
When confronted with the unfathomed, can any answer bring peace? 
Long Synopsis
Petros (40) and Anna (30) have moved to Norilsk from Athens a few months ago. Petros, a distinguished environmental engineer, rational and cool-headed, has undertaken an innovative project for the city’s heavy industrial plant. 
Their lives are unexpectedly disrupted when Anna gets pregnant. They both know Petros can’t be the father. Their sexual life has been non-existent since their arrival in Norilsk. Petros at first thinks Anna cheated on him but her shock about the inexplicable pregnancy and her evident love in him, makes Petros believe in her. 
The two of them slowly take different paths in an effort to make sense of their situation. Anna, seeing Petros gradually drifting away from her trying to rationalize the inexplicable, finds comfort and peace in delving into the mystical nature of local beliefs who see her as a Saint, giving birth to a new Messiah by parthenogenesis. She finds solace in the local community, headed by her Russian teacher, and does not question their unconditional love and acceptance. 
Petros on the other hand, is building a theory centered against his project proposal for the industrial plant, which, if implemented, will bring significant changes to the nearby river. The river and close by village, hold ancient beliefs, deeply rooted in the Christian beliefs of the local community who strongly oppose the project- the very community that worships Anna. He gets convinced Anna is a victim, unintentionally falling in the darkness of medieval beliefs and tries to stop her. 
The mystical river, the baby without conception and the local church construct an atmosphere of tension, frustration and agony inside the couple. 
Anna, sees Petros as a stubborn child, imprisoned in his need to interpret everything logically, while he frantically tries to find ways to prevent her from giving birth. 
The crisis inside the couple culminates. Faith and rational violently confront each other as the futile struggle for meaning in a constantly changing world becomes an obsession.  
Director's Note
“Not moral hopes or mystical dreams, 
but groundless facts are the true objects of contemplation”
John Gray (“Straw Dogs”)

Due to the current crisis in Greece, it is estimated that around 70% of graduates plan to move abroad. The film’s characters leave Greece to escape the country’s financial crisis and find themselves dealing with another, much deeper crisis that might even be the core of the financial one; an existential crisis in search of meaning and the interpretation of a world in the process of change. 
Virus is a political film about a couple, in the form of a thriller. The plot evolves around an inexplicable incident; the woman’s pregnancy without sexual intercourse. The crisis brought about in the couple by this mysterious event leads to the conflict of two worlds.
An ideal setting for this is Norilsk. A city in Siberia built under Stalin to serve the needs of heavy mining industry that bears the trauma of the 20th century. Today Norilsk is one of the ten most polluted cities in the world. A place covered with snow 270 days per year with temperatures ranging from -10 to -58 degrees. 
In this volatile and precarious world, the two characters, Anna and Petros, faced with the inexplicable, need a rescue plan; they need to find meaning. They choose different paths that hide the same risks. Petros’ quest for a rational explanation leads him to the painful dilemma: trusting Anna or keeping his faith in reason. Anna turns to faith to cover this void created by the unfathomed mystery. Yet, this path hides the same risks and leads to the same extremities. Violence born in both cases seems unavoidable.
The almost detective-type script structure is undermined by the film’s form; a form that borrows the silent, disturbing setting of Norilsk, copying the softness and slowness of the falling snow. The plot is never highlighted by film features. The camera takes distance, moving at its own pace, without portraying the action. It rather seems as if looking for another dimension of the scene, as if looking for the reflection of events elsewhere, in details of places or in imprints of actions.
Slow travelling, approaching the situation from a distance without ever reaching it, strict straight lines, parallel motions in places where central action is part and not the center of motion, things occurring behind half-opened doors or at the end of corridors. As if there is someone watching, observing not from the point of view of the characters, but through an arbitrary subjectivity. The camera weaves a geometric web of lines approaching the core of things that the two characters, trapped in their own subjectivities, can’t see. VIRUS is a film on the relentless crash of subjectivities.
The almost detective-type script structure is undermined by the film’s form; a form that borrows the silent, disturbing setting of Norilsk, copying the softness and slowness of the falling snow. The plot is never highlighted by film features. The camera takes distance, moving at its own pace, without portraying the action. It rather seems as if looking for another dimension of the scene, as if looking for the reflection of events elsewhere, in details of places or in imprints of actions.
Slow travelling, approaching the situation from a distance without ever reaching it, strict straight lines, parallel motions in places where central action is part and not the center of motion, things occurring behind half-opened doors or at the end of corridors. As if there is someone watching, observing not from the point of view of the characters, but through an arbitrary subjectivity. The camera weaves a geometric web of lines approaching the core of things that the two characters, trapped in their own subjectivities, can’t see. VIRUS is a film on the relentless crash of subjectivities.
 
Technical Specifications Image / Sound
Color / Black & White   Color
 
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» The Greek-French co-production support fund selects five projects
» 58 Projects funded by the Greek Film Center
» Hellenic Television Supports Greek Cinema
 
 
 
       
       
   
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